Beastly Menagerie: Sir Pilkington-Smythe'S Marvelous Collection Of Strange And Unusual Creatures
Beastly Menagerie: Sir Pilkington-Smythe'S Marvelous Collection Of Strange And Unusual Creatures

Beastly Menagerie: Sir Pilkington-Smythe'S Marvelous Collection Of Strange And Unusual Creatures

  • Publish Date: 2013-04-02
  • Binding: Paperback
  • Author: Sir Pilkington-Smythe
Vendor
Lyons Press
Regular price
$35.99
Sale price
$18.44
Quantity must be 1 or more

Attention: For textbook, access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.

Arrives in 3-7 Business Days

A modern-day bestiary of the most incredible animals
the world has ever seenwith 200 full-color illustrations

Our planet is a writhing mass of wondrous life, positively popping at the seams with peculiar creatures. Life has wriggled its way into every conceivable nook and cranny, and nature has belched out organisms into even the most inhospitable environments.

A Beastly Menagerie is a compendium of 100 of these most curious of creatures, from beasts that can fit on a pinhead and survive a saunter into space, to sea creatures just waiting for an excuse to smash a ship to smithereens. And let's not forget to mention the remarkable Jesus Christ lizard, the bone-eating snot flower, the pink fairy armadillo, and the zombie fly.

This beautifully illustrated collection will delight and bedazzle fans of the amazing animal kingdom in equal measure. Narrated by the affable eccentric Sir Pilkington-Smythe and assisted by his cronies at The Proceedings of the Ever So Strange, each entry is an enlightening and marvelous foray into our world and all its wonders . . . topped off with a soupon of silliness.

An excerpt

Sharks are pretty pleased with themselves, and so they should be. You see, they are basically rippling slabs of muscle in gunmetal grey, with row upon row of huge razor-sharp teethawesome eating machines that have remained unchanged for millennia. . . . Of course, some sharks don't look so tough. Think of the bizarre hammerhead, goblin, and frilled sharks. Not that they're to be trifled with. And then there's the cookie cutter shark, a sniveling little guttersnipe who looks more like a fat lady's arm holding a kitchen utensil than the pinnacle of predatory evolution.


Customer Reviews