To The End Of The Land (Vintage International)

To The End Of The Land (Vintage International)

  • Publish Date: 2011-08-09
  • Binding: Paperback
  • Author: David Grossman
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In this stunning, bestselling noveland an NBCC Award finalistDavid Grossman tells the powerful story of a mothers love for her son. Just before his release from service in the Israeli army, Oras son Ofer is sent back to the front for a major offensive. In a fit of preemptive grief and magical thinking, so that no bad news can reach her, Ora sets out on an epic hike in the Galilee. She is joined by an unlikely companionAvram, a former friend and lover with a troubled pastand as they sleep out in the hills, Ora begins to conjure her son. Ofers story, as told by Ora, becomes a surprising balm both for her and for Avramand a mothers haunting meditation on war and family.

ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR: The Christian Science Monitor, The Economist, The New Republic, The New Yorker, The Washington Post, and The Pittsburgh Post Gazette

A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK

Amazon Best of the Month, September 2010: To the End of the Land is a book of mourning for those not dead, a mother's lament for life during a wartime that has no end in sight. At the same time, it's joyously and almost painfully alive, full to the point of rupture with the emotions and the endless quotidian details of a few deeply imagined lives. Ora, the Israeli mother in Grossman's story, is surrounded by men: Ilan and Avram, friends and lovers who form with her a love triangle whose intimacies and alliances fit no familiar shape, and their sons Adam and Ofer, one for each father, from whom Ora feels her separation like a wound. When Ofer, freshly released from his army service, volunteers for an action in the West Bank instead of going on a planned hike with his mother in the north of Israel, she goes instead with Avram, who fathered Ofer but has never met him and has lived in near-seclusion since being tortured as a prisoner in the Yom Kippur war three decades before. As they walk and carefully reveal themselves to each other again, Grossman builds an overwhelming portrait of, as one character says, the "thousands of moments and hours and days" that make "one person in the world," and of the power of war to destroy such a person, even--or especially--when they survive its cruel demands. --Tom Nissley

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